mjj (flemmings) wrote,
mjj
flemmings

Something at First Known When Lost reminded me of the poem To a fat lady seen from the train, which is ahem reflective of a certain mindset, as well as being a useful example of the triolet, as In Flanders Fields is of the rondeau:

O why do you walk through the fields in gloves,
Missing so much and so much?
O fat white woman whom nobody loves,
Why do you walk through the fields in gloves,
When the grass is soft as the breast of doves
And shivering sweet to the touch?
O why do you walk through the fields in gloves,
Missing so much and so much?

Mostly it was Chesterton's response I was after, which the first link fails to give in its entirety:

The Fat White Woman Speaks

Why do you rush through the field in trains,
Guessing so much and so much?
Why do you flash through the flowery meads,
Fat-head poet that nobody reads;
And why do you know such a frightful lot
About people in gloves as such?
And how the devil can you be sure,
Guessing so much and so much,
How do you know but what someone who loves
Always to see me in nice white gloves
At the end of the field you are rushing by,
Is waiting for his Old Dutch?

Which is a natural reaction, but not a triolet, and still positing that 'You're nobody till somebody (male) loves you.' I prefer Hollyer's take:
I love to think that the poor old "fat white woman" is really a defiant Older Woman having a ball and behaving disgracefully. This is the bit I mean:
When I am an old woman I shall wear purple
With a red hat which doesn’t go, and doesn’t suit me.
And I shall spend my pension on brandy and summer gloves...
Tags: place, verse
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