mjj (flemmings) wrote,
mjj
flemmings

Illness is the most tiresome thing imaginable. It rots the brain. As this morning, when I realized my glasses were cloudy and sprayed them with cleaner, both sides, and wiped them, and wondered why they were even cloudier, not to say opaque. This will happen when you spray Liquid Bandage™ on your lenses.

Been meaning to quote this one for a while:
欧: Ō: Europe, Eu-- Formerly 歐. 欠 is lack here in its literal sense of gaping mouth. 區/区 is ward/section. Though the 品 of 區 probably referred initially to various enclosures, because of the similarity to mouth 口, 區 was often chosen as a phonetic in words relating to the mouth.

Here it is used to express the sound Ō. (Though as an independent character, 區 is now invariably read KU, it is also listed as having the minor reading Ō, both readings appearing to stem from an original reading of YOKU/ EOKU/ EUKU or similar.) Thus to make the sound Ō (EO/ EU) with a gaping mouth, a reference to groaning while vomiting. (欧) can still be used to mean vomit in Chinese, while in Japanese this is expressed by the character 嘔, which uses an ordinary mouth 口 instead of a gaping mouth 欠.

The character was also chosen as the phonetic for the EU of Europe, as well as Eustachian, Euclid, etc. Why a character of such emetic connotations should be chosen to represent Europe is a matter of some conjecture. While it is true there are very few characters with a reading of this particular type of Ō (EU/EO, as opposed to OO, OU etc.) it should be noted there is a perfectly good non-general use character 謳 (言 is words) which is read Ō/EU/EO and has a meaning of praise or extol.
Ewww-rup, obviously. (And if you look in the wordtank, they give you the reading 'ha(ku)/ to vomit' right next to the ō of ōbei the West.)
Tags: japanese, rl_09
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