mjj (flemmings) wrote,
mjj
flemmings

Geography for seniors

Reading about hegemons in Spring-Autumn period in Japanese (hardcover book smelling slightly of mold) requires having hanzi for all the state names, to say nothing of a few provinces and cities. I shall begin with the states, anyway, and put it here to be handy. (Discover wiki didn't alter its S-A map: it's this damned monitor that makes wiki's maps too dark to see clearly.)

Cai  蔡 (in 河南)
Cao  (too unimportant for wiki to give hanzi)
Chen   陳 (city-state-ish, in east 河南 bordering Chu)
Chǔ   楚
Huá   滑 (also in 河南)
Jin   晋/ 晉 (in Shanxi 山西)
Lu   魯/鲁 (central and s-w 山東)
(parenthetically, the hanzi simplifications that grate on me most are the ones for 車and 東. Utterly unnecessary IMHO.)

Qi   齊/齐, also in Shandong
Qǐ   杞
Qin   秦 of future glory
Shu   蜀 in the Sichaun Basin 四川盆地 (same-ish as Liu Bei's 蜀 of my current reading)
Song   宋
Teng   滕
Wei   衞/ 卫 (not to be confused with oni-bearing 魏 of my other current reading)
Wu   吳 (mouth of the Yangtse, capital was pd Suzhou 蘇州/ 苏州 in Jiangsu 江苏/ 江蘇; much smaller than 3K 吴)
Yan   燕 (capital Beijing in pd 河北)
Yue  越國 (in pd coastal Zhèjiāng 浙江)
Zheng  鄭 (city state in 河南)

Chu once incorporated parts of modern Hunan 湖南
Hubei 湖北
Chongqing 重庆/重慶
Shanghai (god, that place was big; Chongqing and Shanghai are nowhere near each other)
and parts of Jiangsu 江苏/ 江蘇 on the coast. Howcum those upstarts from Wu were able to defeat them?

Here is the map of Chinese provinces (no, don't bother to put the hanzi in, guys, argh or indicate rivers and mountains argh argh argh) which one can at least click to find the separate articles.
Tags: 3k, china, history, place
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